Day 7: Interactive Learning Day at the ELCA Youth Gathering

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Day 7: (Saturday) was a great day. We began the day by sleeping in! (Yay!)

Some folks swam at the pool for a bit.

And then we went to the bus stop to catch our bus to the NRG Center.

We spent the rest of the afternoon in the Interactive Learning Center at the NRG center.

We first made our way to the Valparaiso University booth to say hello to former ECT youth group member and current college student, Kalleb.

Then we visited several other exhibits and learned about a variety of issues:

1. First stop was the #MeToo Exhibit:

2. Second stop was Lantern Hill Mexico: This is an education and nutrition program for impoverished children. This ministry seeks to break the cycle of poverty by ensuring children to stay in school instead of dropping out and working in fields or factories at young ages like many others in rural Mexico.

At the exhibit, we learned about the organization and painted designs and inspirational Spanish phrases on school benches for Mexican students in Ensenada.

3. Third stop was Peace Not Walls. Through accompaniment, advocacy and awareness-raising, Peace Not Walls connects ELCA members to our companions and promotes dignity, full respect for human rights, healing and reconciliation. With our Palestinian Lutheran companions, we also accompany Palestinians and Israelis, Jews, Christians and Muslims working together for peace with justice.

At the center, we learned a bit about the plight of Palestinians in Israel/Palestine.

4. Next, we visited the Reconciling Works Exhibit, an independent Lutheran nonprofit that works for the full welcome, inclusion and celebration of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQIA+) people in the Lutheran church. It is our vision that the church is a place where LGBTQ people and their families can worship and thrive, bringing all their God-given gifts to mission and ministry for the world. There, Pastor Michael Fick walked our group through the different flags and explained what they mean.

5. We stopped at the Racial Justice Ministries booth. The Racial Justice Ministries of the ELCA are catalysts and bridge-builders committed to the work of equipping leaders, training, building alliances and supporting ecumenical networks so that together, throughout the church in public witness, programs and policies advance racial justice – locally and globally.

6. We wanted to go to the LIRS (Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services) and AMMPARO booth that takes you through what it would be like as migrants and refugees seeking safety in a new land. The bad news was that the lines were so long that we were unable to make it through the exhibit. The great news is that 5000 people went through the excited and signed letters to their legislators.

Then we needed to have some fun…

Even and especially when we were waiting in long lines!

Mass gathering was full of fun and powerful speakers and worship.

Immanuel Lutheran’s very own Rev. Stephen Bouman spoke about what it was like to be Bishop in New York during 9/11.

The theme for the evening was God’s Hope Changes Everything. So Rev. Bouman said: “But hope cannot be crushed. There were many hero’s in the towers. The question often asked in tragedies “where the hell is God?” was being answered in small acts of compassion. God will use our hope to move our grief and anger into action.

I see you following Jesus who Changes Everything.

I see you: called to radical hope, being what you were born to be.

You are the church who will change everything.

Deborah D.E.E.P Mouton explained:

“Opposite of hope is not hate. It’s apathy. There is so much wrong that you can just right. There is so much more of you to give.”

Carson McCullar shared his powerful story about his addiction.

“I may have lost hope in me but God never did. No matter how hard things might be, there is a light of hope (for me it was through the friends and family who never gave up in me.)

Then Jamie Bruesehoff introduced her 11 year old daughter Rebekah, who shared her story.

Rebekah explained how sometimes as she began to under herself as transgender, she wondered: “Did God mess up? I’ve come to realize God does not make mistakes. God made me me.

I have a lot of support but so many transgender kids don’t.

Transgender kids are just like other kids. We need to be loved and supported.

Hearts and minds can change. I can change the world.

I want people to know that it doesn’t matter our age. We can be hope for the church and all people. They need us.

I have hope for a church where people are not just welcomed, but they are celebrated.

We can make it happen.

You – each and every one of you – made in God’s image are made to be hope in the church and made to be hope in the world. You are my hope.”

Finally, Joe Davis spoke. He explained:

“This generation is the one that will disrupt fear with courage and status quo with radical hope.

You are here for a reason: Not just for the future but for the here and now.

Differences are a gift. We are created for a purpose. Say you have a purpose not just in the church.

Show up unapologetically as your authentic self. The church and world need you.

You are a generation that’s teaching us enough is enough.

…Radical hope is when we celebrate not what we see now but what it can be. Things can and will be transformed. But there will be struggle, and so we practice this hope every day.

This hope changes me. This hope changes you this Hope Changes Everything.”

After the mass gathering, our brought beauty, a positive energy, and joy to those around us as we sang songs from MYLE.

What a wonderful day!

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